Toolkit

toolkit

The Toolkit (Title TBA) is an initiative of The HEAL Project. The toolkit is a community driven manual on how to communicate, educate, and overcome the hurdles of “The Talk” with our children. This Toolkit is a life-hack helping us to communicate with our children about sexuality, and to help prevent and end child sexual abuse.

Click Here to Submit

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The HEAL Project  is Calling all Parents, Guardians (of young and adult children), Adults connected to children/youth (aunts, grandparents, Godparents, uncles, etc) and Mentors!

The Toolkit, an initiative of The HEAL Project, is seeking submissions from mentors, adults connected to children/youth and parents/guardians of all family configurations.

This online Toolkit is a community driven manual on how to communicate, educate, and overcome the hurdles of “The Talk” with our children. It is a life-hack helping us to communicate with our children about sexuality, and to help prevent and end child sexual abuse.

The sex(uality) topics are broad. We are interested in new, innovative, simple, harm-reducing, radical, quick, funny, and/or long-term input on one of the most important talks you’ll ever have with your child(ren).

prod9230_1_lgThe HEAL Project acknowledges that sex(uality) education is currently a privilege, however believes that it should be a right. Sex(uality) education should be age-appropriately taught and discussed from birth to crossing over. Here are just some of the topics we hope to cover in the Toolkit: sex, desire, sexual health, body image, sexual orientation, sexual violence, gender identity, self care, masturbation, BDSM, consent, boundary setting, safe words, sexism, rape culture, love, casual sex, marriage, sex toys, and more.  

Do you have a tip, a pitfall, a success story, a game, a fear, or a communication style you’d like to share? Or is there a question you’d like to ask? We are accepting comments, skill-shares, and questions now. Submissions can be anywhere from 100-800 words.

Note: The HEAL Project acknowledges the disparities in sex(uality) education, sexual health access, and resources available to people of color, poor people, people with disabilities, and LGBTQI communities. We highly encourage everyone, especially those who belong to the above and other marginalized groups, to participate. We encourage the intersectional lens—race and sexuality; sexism and sex ed; desire and disability, gender identity and love, etc.

Click Here to Submit